Thanksgiving Favorite!

Growing up in New Hampshire, we always had Indian Pudding at Thanksgiving.  I took this delicacy for granted until I moved to other areas of the country where the dish was virtually unknown.  Best described as a cross between bread pudding and pumpkin pie, it is perfect served warm with a side of natural vanilla bean ice cream.

Indian Pudding first appeared in New England during the 17th century. It grew in popularity and became a Thanksgiving staple. However, Indian Pudding seems to be fading from memory, even in our region.  I have enclosed our family recipe below (with lactose free equivalents).  If you are looking for a new treat, give it a whirl!

Classic Indian Pudding

5 Cups Whole Milk (yes, whole milk as skim and fat free do not work. Lactose Free will also work)

½ cup Yellow Corn Meal

½ cup Sugar

½ Cup Molasses

¼ Cup Butter (for Lactose Free use Margarine)

1 Teaspoon Salt

1 Teaspoon Pumpkin Pie Spice (If unavailable, mix ½ tsp cinnamon, ½ tsp ginger, and ½ teaspoon nutmeg)

Preheat Oven to 350. Combine 2 cups milk with corn meal, sugar, molasses, butter, salt, and spice in heavy sauce pan.  Heat on medium heat until bubbly, stirring occasionally. Simmer for 5 minutes or until thickened.  Pour into buttered baking dish (8 cup dish). Stir in 2 more cups milk. Bake for one hour. Stir in remaining one cup milk and back for approximately 1-2 hours or until set (jiggly, but still soft)

Serve with Natural Vanilla Bean Ice Cream (I have also found lactose free ice cream, but it can be a challenge to find)

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When Seasons Change

At Summer’s end,  Autumn’s begins;

Sometimes it takes an ending to find a beautiful beginning!

Autumn Apple Picking

Fall is arguably the most beautiful season in New Hampshire. The leaves provide a visually brilliant backdrop, and combined with moderate temperatures and no bugs, there is no better time to enjoy the outdoors. A must see-and-do item is apple picking. Start the day with a tractor ride to the farthest reaches of the orchid, followed by a leisurely stroll through scenic vistas. Finish with some warm apple cider and then take your little red treasures home to bake. One of my favorites is an apple brownie with cinnamon sugar on top.  Yum, Yum!

Corbin Covered Bridge

One of New Hampshire’s covered bridges nestled in the woods of Newport. I spent my childhood fishing here with my family, never truly appreciating the beauty. Now that my parents have passed, this place touches my heart just as much as my visual senses.

Mount Washington, New Hampshire

A must see adventure when traveling in New England!

The Mount Washington Auto Road leads to one of the most beautiful places on earth. While known for record breaking winds and cold, spectacular vistas set in an almost mystical background provide a paradise for outdoor lovers, photography buffs, and thrill seekers. Note…the auto road is not for the faint at heart. Anyone with a fear of heights should consider taking the Cog Railway, another adventure in itself.

As you wind up the narrow road, take your time to stop and explore the areas (plus your car will appreciate the break). This is a two lane road, so meeting traffic requires a little finesse. Once at the top, break out your sweatshirt…even in the summer. The day I went was a beautiful 70 degree day, but the summit was 42 degrees with a wind chill of 17 degrees.

You will find breathtaking hiking trails, but heed any warning signs and always be prepared. Tuckerman’s Ravine is one of the most famous trails in the world, but can also be dangerous…respect the terrain.  After your summit adventure, take a break in their cafe for a warm cup of chili and enjoy a museum dedicated to this famous mountain.

Apple Picking in New Hampshire

Fall is arguably the most beautiful season in New Hampshire. The leaves provide a visually brilliant backdrop, and combined with moderate temperatures and no bugs, there is no better time to enjoy the outdoors. A must see-and-do item is apple picking. Start the day with a tractor ride to the farthest reaches of the orchid, followed by a leisurely stroll through scenic vistas. Finish with some warm apple cider and then take your little red treasures home to bake. This year’s first creation is an apple brownie with cinnamon sugar on top.  Yum, Yum!

Stay tuned for more apple inspired desserts!

Fall Favorites Food Series

Growing up in New Hampshire, we always had Indian Pudding at Thanksgiving.  I took this delicacy for granted until I moved to other areas of the country where the dish was virtually unknown.  Best described as a cross between bread pudding and pumpkin pie, it is perfect served warm with a side of natural vanilla bean ice cream.

Indian Pudding first appeared in New England during the 17th century. It grew in popularity and became a Thanksgiving staple. However, Indian Pudding seems to be fading from memory, even in our region.  I have enclosed our family recipe below (with lactose free equivalents).  If you are looking for a new treat, give it a whirl!

Classic Indian Pudding

5 Cups Whole Milk (yes, whole milk as skim and fat free do not work. Lactose Free will also work)

½ cup Yellow Corn Meal

½ cup Sugar

½ Cup Molasses

¼ Cup Butter (for Lactose Free use Margarine)

1 Teaspoon Salt

1 Teaspoon Pumpkin Pie Spice (If unavailable, mix ½ tsp cinnamon, ½ tsp ginger, and ½ teaspoon nutmeg)

Preheat Oven to 350. Combine 2 cups milk with corn meal, sugar, molasses, butter, salt, and spice in heavy sauce pan.  Heat on medium heat until bubbly, stirring occasionally. Simmer for 5 minutes or until thickened.  Pour into buttered baking dish (8 cup dish). Stir in 2 more cups milk. Bake for one hour. Stir in remaining one cup milk and back for approximately 1-2 hours or until set (jiggly, but still soft)

Serve with Natural Vanilla Bean Ice Cream (I have also found lactose free ice cream, but it can be a challenge to find)